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with guns and are not in favor of gun control. if you grew up in a city, an urban environment with more guns and crime, you're probably less in favor of guns and more in favor of gun control. if that holds true, there is not going to be a huge majority in congress for gun-control. seems like it will be pretty split. host: including democrats? caller: including democrats, although a smaller number. some of the ones who were gun owners said that boehner is in favor of gun control. he said he was a gun owner, but that he believed that some gun controls, particularly background checks, are important. there were 120 republicans that own guns, only 46 democrats told us that they own guns. 76% of congress answered our questions. host: why did people not answer your question? caller: they gave a variety of reasons. we had about 60 people total applying by saying that they would not talk about it. several said that it was safety reasons, that they did not think it was appropriate to talk about their security. several of them said that they did not want to tell burglars that they had guns, because bur
in the city in ohio and if i did not have a public pension i think that would have been working for the rest of my life. an earlier caller mentioned pensions being affected, but when this crisis happened, you had to have some faith in the economic system. when you look at what happened during the depression, we came out of it. i figured at that time that the country would eventually come out of it. where would we have been five years later? nowhere. i have a tendency to side with the republicans, but at the same time i still think that some of those protections were warranted for people. into the system you get so many people on fox news, knocking down public pensions. the average person in ohio makes about $26,000 per year. all of that talk about locking down those pensions is just bad, really bad, they should stop it. host: what is your pension look like? tell us about it. caller: it is not a bad tension. they did change this, it has changed. you are able to retire at 55, but they changed it to 57. you need 25 years in the system to do that. most people will go for 30 years in ohio. i am a
a place that's its richard king maps -- redistricting maps. the only african a member of the city council lost his seat. seems like a perfect reason why we need section 5. the only black member lost his district. this stuff happens more often in places like alabama, texas, and mississippi. so many different people are urging that section 5 be upheld. host: we have a tweet for you from maverick. guest: well, if they say it needs to be expanded, that would treat state the same. ari keep saying there is more demonstration -- discrimination in cover states and the facts don't bear that out. there's no evidence that states are evading court decrees or otherwise practicing discrimination, and that's what led to passage of section 5. section 2 remains. that was the only objection in the entire state of alabama in the last 12 years. one objection. the entire state should be remain covered under section 5 because of one objection? host: sacramento, california, dj. caller: voting is not a privilege, it is a right. i should not be restricted because of my color in that pursued. you guys never have t
adn from new york city steve mcmahan. thank you to both of the. as we look at the state of the union, what do you think about the tone? what about the term of the president's delivery ended the way he was saying his message? guest: i think he did what many presidents do in the state of the union address, he laid out an agenda for the future. those things tend to be kind of a list. then he built to a crescendo at the end on having a vote on the gun-control measures that he has introduced. i thought it was a terrific state of the union address that did lay out the agenda. republicans know what it is he would like to accomplish. american people know what is at stake. now we will see if congress is willing to act. guest: you had the inaugural and the state of the union. he laid out a pretty aggressive liberal agenda. obviously there will be some differences of opinion that emerge out of this. whether it be the debt ceiling, the sequester, the continuing resolution of getting the budget, the sequence of things the speech set up in terms of the beginning of this course. having said that, i
counties and cities do that across the board -- spending reductions generally, they do it with flexibility to the different departments can re reprogrammed-and replace and adjusted. that's the way it should be. host: from twitter -- guest: the keystone xl pipeline is a good point. it has been awhile since the president has delayed a decision on keystone. as bipartisan support and the governor of nebraska has said let's get this rolling and keystone is a great idea. that would be a great first start. permitting some oil exploration and drilling and development is another one in that same sector. you can look at what has happened in north dakota with the amount of drilling and production. another thing the president could do today that would lead to job growth is look at his federal agencies. the federal regulatory agencies have 291,000 employees. 291,000 employees. last year, they issued 4000 new regulations which are thousands of pages of instructions and the federal register. that -- he needs to for -- it makes it impossible for new regulations. he should allow a review and get some of th
as a prosecutor for the city of seattle. jim in enterprise, alabama. republican line. caller: thank you. i have a couple of questions. number one, on the sequester, how much are your democrats planning on cutting out of the military budget? number two, it seems as though the president has been flip- flopping on this. when it first came out, he said it was devastating, it will kill everything in this country. now he said unless you work on a military base, you probably will not see any difference. which one of these statements is a lie? guest: actually, the president made neither of those statements. he has consistently said it will have a sizable impact that will negatively affect the country and the economy. number two, he has not now said it was only affect the military. his cabinet has been out talking about the variety of impacts it will have a bunch of different places. -- it will have in a bunch of different places. i did not vote for the budget control act, but a lot of democrats did, a lot of republicans did, and the president signed it. they all signed it thinking it would not happen.
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6